Sunday, June 21, 2015

Holden On.

Max went on an outing with his car club today and paid a visit to a Holden collector, who has almost 70 in his collection. Here are some of his snaps.
FJs.
FE & HQ.
VL & VB.
HQ & HJ with through-flow ventilation !
A closer look at the FE ute.
EH Premier.
EK Special.
Utes sedans and wagons.
Later they went to a restoration specialist.
1953 Mk VII Jag, 1934 Lincoln Towncar V12 and 1972 Ford Falcon XA Hardtop.

A closeup of the '34 Lincoln.....
...and a look at the flat-head V12.

Sunday, June 14, 2015

AEC Identification.

The identification of the model of AEC in my last blog has been solved. The slightly blurred badge looked like it read "Matador", but I knew this couldn't be correct as Matadors were forward control 4x4 military vehicles from WW2 era, although many found a new life as recovery or tow wagons after the war. But I did have a nagging memory that some export models weren't always badged the same as the home market models. I was right. This particular vehicle would have been a Mandator on the home market, but for some reason some export models were given the Matador badge.
It must have been very confusing when ordering parts.
Here is a clearer photo of the Matador from Neil Fraser's AEC website, which is well worth a look.
www.aecsouthall.co.uk

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

More from Rocklea.

The rest of Paul's shots from the Rocklea Truck Show.
A couple of Mack CF fire trucks and a Ultra-liner.
Late 30s or early 40s AEC.
I can't quite read the model name. Majestic, Mercury or something else I haven't thought of.
One of those big fronted Americans that I like.
Mack Super-liner with long range tanks, bull-bar, twin intake and exhaust stacks and a large sleeper box.
What more could a man want?
Paul's silhouette, with his stetson on, also visible in the picture.
Mack's B series was a popular truck in its day.
Its rounded profile and sloping two piece windshield mimicked cars of the period.
This tandem drive example has many extras.
Western Star, International, T-Line Internationals with the extended cab which were usually marketed as Atkinsons.
I assume the Inter second from left is a Transtar. Its 4 headlamps and dividing strip down the grille could get it mistaked for a White Road Boss.
Another B series Mack, this time with single drive.
Two old Leylands look to be of similar age, but note the different steering wheel positions and Paul's outline again.

Monday, June 8, 2015

Australian Correspondent

Paul from Ayr in Queensland, Australia has sent me some pics from the Rocklea Truck Show in Brisbane last month. Paul obviously hasn't got an expensive camera, but these are worth a look.
I've always liked any of the American conventionals with big square grilles up front.
The International Transtar being one of them.
A trio of Kenworths.
International must date from around 1915 to 1923.
From 1924 Inters had their radiator mounted in the more conventional "ïn front of engine" position.
International 3070s were a popular truck in NZ, both in 8 wheeler and 6 wheeler models.
Usually powered by the big V8 Cummins 903.
903 cubic inches equates to 14.8 litres, but power was only about 325 horses and most often coupled to a 15 speed Roadranger.
These Iveco models have never been seen in NZ. Using a development of the T-Line Inter cab, which in itself was a development of the old  cab used on the 3070 at right.
Another model not seen in NZ. The late H model Mack was produced  from about 1958 until the start of production of the G model in 1959 (although there was some overlap) which in turn was replaced by the F model that we are all familiar with.
R model Macks are well known on both sides of the Tasman, with their tilt forward fibre-glass bonnet, but were also available .......
....with a metal butterfly type bonnet like the one pictured here.
These were rare in NZ, but I do know that one of the oil companies used one in the Wellington area at one stage.
It was, I believe, shipped in from Aus to cover for another truck which had experienced some sort of mishap.
Kenworth T904 are usually seen in NZ as day cabs, but here is a typically Aussie rigged unit with sleeper cab, bull-bar, a row of powerful driving lights and long range fuel tanks.

Sunday, June 7, 2015

Some Local Shots from this Week.

Eight year old Car Distribution Group, Isuzu CYJ Giga 330, has just loaded some cars and driver is now using a measured pole to check his load height.
Old 1998 Cummins powered Foden S108, supplies oil to my workplace.
Driver says,"Ït's a beast, but I like driving it."

Saturday, June 6, 2015

And a Couple More !!

Max dug up these two from "The White's Aviation Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library".
Grumman Avenger converted for top-dressing is supplied by the sack load from a Transport Wairarapa Federal in May 1949.
Nissan with two axle self-steering semi-trailer in the 70s.

Friday, June 5, 2015

And Some More

S model Bedford with brand new steel stock crate, poses in the "Horseshoe"car park.
Tiger Moth appears to have had a mishap and Transport Wairarapa's  Bedford is called upon to carry it away.
The 6x6 GMC had no end to its capabilities.
Fleet number on the door confirms it is the same unit used as a tractor in other pics.
Above the nose of the Ford can be seen the premises of H.J.Jones, which was well known in Masterton as the Morris dealer, but at this time it was obviously Masterton's Hudson and Packard outlet.
The small building on the semi-trailer appears to have an enormous overhang, but.....
....no, the rear is supported by the trusty GMC.
Note the fellow on the roof with his insulated stick to lift the power lines, dressed neatly in his hat and tie !!
If  you're going to roll your Austin truck, I guess you may as well do it with minimal damage.
GMC and load was just too heavy.
What ever year this was, I'm picking that no. 10 was pride of the fleet going by the several pics of her loaded with wool.
I think this may be the same load, from the starboard side of the late 40s, early 50s Ford..
Different day, but similar load.